Testing question (No.4)

Q: What is the difference between verification and validation?
A: Verification takes place before validation, and not vice versa. Verification evaluates documents, plans, code, requirements, and specifications. Validation, on the other hand, evaluates the product itself.
The inputs of verification are checklists, issues lists, walk-throughs and inspection meetings, reviews and meetings. The input of validation, on the other hand, is the actual testing of an actual product.
The output of verification is a nearly perfect set of documents, plans, specifications, and requirements document. The output of validation, on the other hand, is a nearly perfect, actual product.

Q: What is up time?
A: "Up time" is the time period when a system is operational and in service. Up time is the sum of busy time and idle time.
For example, if, out of 168 hours, a system has been busy for 50 hours, idle for 110 hours, and down for 8 hours, then the busy time is 50 hours, idle time is 110 hours, and up time is (110 + 50 =) 160 hours.

Q: What is user friendly software?
A: A computer program is user friendly, when it is designed with ease of use, as one of the primary objectives of its design.

Q: What is a virtual address?
A: In virtual storage systems, virtual addresses are assigned to auxiliary storage locations. They allow those location to be accessed as though they were part of the main storage.

Q: What is virtual memory?
A: Virtual memory relates to virtual storage. In virtual storage, portions of a user’s program and data are placed in auxiliary storage, and the operating system automatically swaps them in and out of main storage as needed.

Q: What is virtual storage?
A: Virtual storage is a storage allocation technique, in which auxiliary storage can be addressed as though it was part of main storage. Portions of a user’s program and data are placed in auxiliary storage, and the operating system automatically swaps them in and out of main storage as needed.

Q: What is disaster recovery testing?
A: Disaster recovery testing is testing how well the system recovers from disasters, crashes, hardware failures, or other catastrophic problems.

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